Wednesday, January 7, 2009

Chapter 6, Page 38 Is there a God?

Does God exist?

Quite heavy stuff to end the chapter on, eh? Well, the next chapter starts a little heavier but gets lighter after that. Just an FYI.

I could have gone on with Dad's explanation, but that would get long and I don't want to sound like I'm preaching. (Especially since I know there are readers out there who don't hold the same world views as I do.) Trying to find a balance between the importance of religion in Mary's life and making this work accessible to a wide audience is a little tricky. I'll just leave it at Mary's question about the existence of God gets answered in a satisfactory manner.

2 comments:

Brian, aka Nanoc, aka Norski said...

Not so easy, is it?

Reminds me of the Family Circus panels and strips: That was a Catholic family, but one of the few ways you could tell was some of the items drawn in the background.

About that faith/reason thing, and documentation: thanks for the nudge. Eventually, I'll post about those, or related topics, in A Catholic Citizen in America (blatant and shameless plug).

One point that isn't so much a proof as something to think about: Egypt under the pharaohs had what we would call a state-run media.

At one point, a decade or three back, a bit was being made about how there were no Egyptian records of those plagues of Egypt and the Moses thing.

Actually, there was a group of, ah, workers, called the Habi-ru, who dropped out of sight about that time, but never mind.

Let's look at this from the pharaoh's point of view: he's let a sizable number of valuable workers leave Egypt: and was indirectly responsible for an economically devastating series of disasters that wiped out crops, livestock, and a goodly fraction of the population. And, to top it all off, gave the order that wiped out a crack military unit.

Think about it: Would someone who can control what gets written and what doesn't really want to broadcast that, and make sure it gets recorded for posterity?

Back to MQC: You've got a valid point. People aren't used to seeing 'that religious stuff' in print - and what they are exposed to tends to be a bit wack. Makes it a little challenging for someone trying to portray happenings in a Catholic family.

Brigid said...

Really? I hadn't noticed! Of course, I started reading the strip back when I didn't even know there were people who *weren't* Catholic, so maybe I just took it for granted.