Friday, December 18, 2009

Chapter 9, Page 20 Awesome

Middle age, middle class fathers aren't often like this.

You don't usually expect this sort of thing from someone who looks like Dad. Well, I suppose it's getting more common now that people who grew up with rock are getting to be Dad's age, but it still takes a lot of folks by surprise.

I think it's fun. Dad being like that and the reaction people have to it.

I'll be taking a bit of a break until the new year to try to draw a bit of a buffer for MQC. Also spend time with family over the holidays and try to figure out what I'm doing for the cover of the next chapter. Anyway, thought I'd let you know.

12 comments:

Dan (AKA Croatoan5376@Yahoo.com) said...

I was thinking about this the other day, how music is such a fluid medium...how much of what is considered "country" today would have been classified as "rock" only twenty years ago. Or, vice verse, how what was labeled as the hardest variety of rock 'n' roll back in the 1960s and 70s would barely even be considered such today.

Brigid said...

@Dan: This is true. There are times when I just want to forget the whole genre business and just categorize music by 'like' and 'dislike.'

Dan (AKA Croatoan5376@yahoo.com) said...

I basically do the same thing with movies (I may alphabetize my DVD collection, keep live-action separate from animated, but that's about the extent of it). I was reminded why I don't get too technical just the other day when I got into a disagreement with a coworker over exactly what constituted "fantasy", what was science "fiction", where they overlapped and diverged (labels are t3h 3v3l...especially where more than one is appropriate!). "Like It" or "Don't Like It"...I like that method.

Robert said...

Considering Rock started out when my parents were kids, what would be wrong with Brigid's dad liking Rock? Tsk, silly storekeepers.

Funny thing is, Brigid, I categorize music by your system rather than by artist. Naturally, the RIAA (and "artists") hates people like me because we'd rather buy one song than an album that has two or three good songs and a lot of... shoddy music.

Rob H.

Brigid said...

@Dan: Fantasy, Sci-fi, and the less than clear division between them, is an area that I'd really rather not get into an argument over. @.@ Particularly since any attempt to differentiate between the two results in leaving out a lot of stories. My own tendency when I do have to categorize things by genre is to put the two in the same category. Which I suppose would start another argument with someone. Oy vey.

@Robert: Oh yeah. I think people like us are why it's finally possible to purchase individual songs online. Though the limits on use is still very annoying. Too much paranoia in protecting intellectual property can be as detrimental to sales as not enough.

Zach said...

Hey, I remember that album!

Nice taste, Dad. Very nice messing with the clerk's mind, too.


peace,
Zach

Dan (AKA Croatoan5376@Yahoo.com) said...

@ Brigid: Yes, putting the two in the same category will most definitely trigger it's own share of arguments (as in the case of the aforementioned disagreement...I took the side of "They're the same thing", which didn't go over well). Never mind the unpleasantness that you can get into if you bring up that (best unmentioned) sticky little sub-genre, "speculative fiction... :P

Mom and my sister were talking about something today that made me think of this strip: Will the kids of today be listening to Hard and Industrial Rock, watching anime and music videos, and movies like "Avatar" or the works of Michael Bay and Jerry Bruckheimer 50 or 60 years from now? Strange though it seems, I think that the answer may be "yes"...

Brigid said...

@Zach: You listen to Petra, too? Cool. Dad notes that it wasn't his intent to confuse the clerk, but he did enjoy the effect.

@Dan: Hoo boy. I'm not even entirely sure what "speculative fiction" is supposed to be. Isn't fiction by it's nature rather speculative, anyway? These things are just too weird sometimes.

As for what kids will be listening to/watching/etc 50-60 years from now, yeah. All of the above or maybe even something else entirely.

Dan (AKA Croatoan5376@Yahoo.com) said...

@ Brigid: the question, though, was more what TODAY'S kids (and our OWN generation, no doubt) might find themselves watching and listening to when they're 60-80 years old. Can be hard to accept the idea that parents and grandparents were "rebellious" youngsters themselves, too (ever find yourself cringing to realize that the next generation will be running this country in your lifetime? I know that I do...but I imagine that George Washington's mother and father did, too).

BTW, "speculative fiction" is the rather cumbersome name for "true" or "realistic" (as opposed to "fantastic") science fiction. In my experience, the most faithful Spec-Fic (the sort which has NO fantastic elements, no matter how small) tends to be woefully yawn-inducing...

Dan (AKA Croatoan5376@Yahoo.com) said...

@ Brigid: and regarding the question of what KIDS will be watching and listening to five or six decades hence...I'd rather not think about it. I generally consider myself to be a pretty open-minded fellow, but I know how much TV and music has changed since *I* was a kid (and it wasn't that long ago, either), and how much it changed just in the ten or so years BEFORE I was born. Turns out movie ratings didn't even exist until the mid-late 1960s. Who knows where media might go in the near future?

Brigid said...

@Dan: Now those are some scary thoughts. Not sure I really want to think about where the various entertainment media will go in the future.

As for the way adults view the next generation, *Socrates* had some things to say about youngsters that sounded an awful lot like complaints people have about kids now. And there is nothing new under the sun...

Robert said...

@Dan: That just means that you've not read well-written speculative fiction. As with all science fiction, it only truly works when the science aspect is a background setting rather than a driving force for the story. In short, the more technobabble and explanation that goes into the scifi, the more boring it is. If the scifi elements are just there, instead of explained, then the scifi works off of STORY instead of SETTING and becomes a viable form of literature.

Rob H.